How parties led by a woman redefine their positions: Empirical evidence for women’s green, alternative, and libertarian agenda

My latest publication in the European Journal of Political Research addresses the question how women party leaders change their organization’s agenda? In this blog post, I present some of the key empirical insights and their theoretical implications. Despite of the increasing number of women serving as party heads, the relationship between the sex of party leaders and their organizations’ positions has received comparably little scholarly attention. What previous research has found is that higher shares of women in party executive committees seem to enhance support for gender quotas but not stances concerning the expansion of redistribution and education (Greene and O’Brien, 2016, Kittilson, 2011). My article provides a systematic assessment of the way women as leaders shape party positions on both, the sociocultural and economic dimension of political conflict. For that purpose, I study 304 manifestos of 102 parties in 19 developed democracies between 1995 and 2018. Data measuring party positions for the two dimensions of political conflict is based on the MARPOR project data (Volkens et al., 2019), i.e. indices identifying the level of party support for redistribution vs. market freedom and green, alternative, libertarian vs. traditionalist, authoritarian, nationalist policies.… Read More How parties led by a woman redefine their positions: Empirical evidence for women’s green, alternative, and libertarian agenda

Literature Review: The Gendered Effects of Public Discontent on Legislative Nominations in Latin America

In this recently published article in Party Politics, Funk, Hinojosa and Piscopo analyze strategic candidate nominations of political parties in response to unfavorable political contexts. They argue that if public discontent with legislatures and perceived corruption is high, political elites have an incentive to nominate more women in order to maximize vote shares. Based on the assumption that women (according to gendered stereotypes) are associated with higher morality, more civic-mindedness and less corruption, political parties strategically assemble more diverse candidate lists in contexts of skepticism. With this strategy, they aim to signal the voter that the party is changing course and thus deserve voters’ trust and, in turn, hope to increase vote shares. Using data from more than 100 political parties in 18 Latin American countries, the authors show that discontent can indeed have gendered effects: parties nominate more women when a large proportion of the public distrusts the national legislature.… Read More Literature Review: The Gendered Effects of Public Discontent on Legislative Nominations in Latin America